Short-Term vs Long-Term Business Financing

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You need to find a solution for financing your small business. A momentary sense of panic hits. Whether it’s for a growth opportunity or a short-term cash infusion to cover expenses, it’s normal to feel overwhelmed or anxious as you approach the borrowing process.

Navigating the lending landscape can be daunting — but it doesn’t have to be this way. With a basic understanding — starting with the difference between short-term vs long-term business financing — you can move forward with greater confidence.

Short-term vs long-term business financing

As their names imply, the primary difference between short-term and long-term business financing is how long you have to pay back the loan. Typically, long-term lending options are paid back over a number of years, while short-term lending options are paid back over a period of months or as little as two years.

Your choice of short-term vs long-term financing will also be determined by:

  • The amount you need to borrow.
  • How quickly you need the funds.
  • The type of lender you’ll borrow from.
  • The type of collateral you’ll provide.
  • Your business’ overall financial health.

From 2015 - 2017, nearly 42 % of small businesses used short-term financing to borrow $10,000 - $50,000.

Short-term vs long-term business financing amounts

Short-term business financing options are for smaller amounts while long-term financing options are for larger amounts. Because short-term financing is for smaller amounts, you pay them back more quickly at a higher interest rate and there’s a shorter approval process. As long-term business financing options are for larger amounts, there’s a longer, more rigorous approval process and it takes more time to pay them back. However, the interest rate is lower than with a short-term loan.

The figures vary, but a rough estimate is that short-term lending amounts are less than $250,000. Long-term lending amounts are in the $500,000 range.

Learn More: How to Read a Cash Flow Statement.

Short-term vs long-term business financing sources

As you’d expect, brick-and-mortar banks are the most common source for long-term business financing. If you’re looking for a traditional short-term “term loan” where you complete a detailed application, including documentation to prove that you repay that amount, you can also go through a large or small bank. (Think sitting across from someone in a business suit.)

However, the market for short-term financial lending has grown rapidly. As a result, businesses can choose from a range of short-term lending options. Again, this doesn’t exclude banks. It simply expands your range of options to include online lenders, with quick approval times and other short-term financing options you may not be aware of. (Plus, no business suits.)  

According to a recent study, from 2015 to 2017 the amount of small business online lending activity increased 50% — representing $10 billion in financing. The same study found that approximately 42 % of small businesses borrowed between $10,000 and $50,000 with the average being $55,498.

online business financing infographic
(PRNewsfoto/ETA)

Traditional short-term business financing options

If you’re not sure you want a traditional term loan, you can also look into a business line of credit as a short-term financing option. A line of credit is different than a loan as it sets up a pre-determined amount that you can draw from whenever you need. A business credit card is also another more traditional short-term business financing option.

Because loans, lines of credit and credit cards are the road more traveled, they also require a more in-depth application process and proof of a stable payment and financial history. In other words, your business has to have a solid credit history and financial track record.

Your payment history for loans, lines of credit and credit cards will also be recorded in your credit history. As will any applications for these forms of financing.

Read More: What’s a Business Credit Report?

Not-so-traditional short-term business financing options

While invoice factoring and invoice financing have both been around since the first bazaars opened in ancient Mesopotamia, many businesses owners don’t even know these options exist.

Invoice factoring and financing let businesses who have incoming cash flow tied up in outstanding invoices use these invoices to access short-term funding quickly and easily. While banks don’t offer this type of asset-based financing, online lenders do. In fact, this type of lending is now a multi-trillion-dollar industry.

Similar to invoice-based lending, there are similarly structured short-term financing options that let businesses use their inventory or retail sales as collateral. (A little research can take you a long way in identifying your options.)

Benefits of online short-term business financing

With online financing, such as invoice factoring, businesses don’t have to go through a lengthy application process as they would with a traditional lender. The primary criteria are the invoice, the customer’s payment history and the business’ risk profile.

As a result, the approval process is much quicker and once the business has established a relationship with the lender, the turnaround times can be even faster.

What’s the Difference: Invoice Factoring vs Invoice Financing.

Online lenders and asset-based financing

Online lenders are also more familiar with small businesses. They understand that there are ups and downs with a business’ cash flow and are more willing to work with newer businesses and businesses experiencing cash flow crisis.

Unlike traditional loans, lines of credit and credit cards, when you use asset-based lending, there’s no impact on your business credit history. Online lenders don’t use the traditional credit rating bureaus, nor do they report to them. The relationship you form is with your lender only.

A short-term vs long-term business financing must-know:
How technology can help you manage your cash flow

At PayPie we’re laying the groundwork to bring small to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) access to affordable funding. First, we’ve developed insightful tools like our free cash flow forecasting that includes a proprietary risk score.

Each report gives a business insights and analysis into how its cash is flowing in and out of their business. In turn, the risk score is an assessment of how other businesses and lenders view your business in terms of establishing financial relationships.

This service is available — free of charge – for any QuickBooks Online user. All you have to do is create a PayPie account, connect your QBO account and run your report. (Integrations with other accounting applications are coming soon.)

We’re working with regulatory authorities to ensure that our invoice factoring will meet all legal and business standards. To find out when this service will be available, register here.

This article is informational only and does not replace the expertise that comes from working with an accountant, bookkeeper or financial professional.

Image via Pexels.

Invoice Factoring vs Invoice Financing

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Invoice factoring vs invoice financing. What’s the difference and why do these lending options exist in the first place? But, first, does this story sound familiar?

At your business, orders are coming in at a consistent pace and you expect payment on a large invoice from one of your most reliable customers in a week or two. Your customer is a little bit late paying you, but you can trust them. The problem is, you have to pay your employees in a few days and you’re a little low on cash.

Thanks to technology and innovators, like PayPie, who’ve realized the inherent need for better short-term lending options for small businesses, your outstanding invoices are assets that can be used to get the funding you so desperately need.

24% of SMEs now turn to alternative small business financing, like invoice factoring and invoice financing

Read More: Why You Should Separate Business and Personal Finances. 

It’s hard for SMEs to find short-term business financing

According to the 2017 Small Business Credit Survey, some of the most common financial challenges many small businesses face are funding short-term operational costs, like wages, buying the materials needed to fill a large purchase order or just paying the bills.

The problem: Traditional brick-and-mortar banks aren’t really set up to handle this kind of short-term lending designed to solve a cash flow crunch. Bank are averse to risk and lower collateral levels, requiring more than the promise of a paid invoice. The approval process slower and less certain, which is also why less than half of all SMEs seek business financing from either large or small banks.

The solution: 24% of SMEs now turn to alternative small business financing, like invoice factoring and invoice financing, from online lenders who offer these options. For many of these businesses, these options are the answer to their cash flow crisis.

Invoice factoring vs invoice financing? They are both good options when you’re in a pinch and you need cash to meet your day-to-day responsibilities.

How SMEs are turning unpaid invoices into cash more quickly

Manufacturers, wholesalers, retailers, distributors and service-based businesses often have a lot of operational cash flow tied up in unpaid invoices (accounts receivables).

Either through payment terms, timing, lateness or other factors, the cycle of cash coming into the company gets out of sync with the timing of expenses, like payroll, rent, utilities and the cost of materials.

Both invoice factoring and invoice financing were developed as solutions these kinds of short-term cash flow problems.

Many SMEs need better short-term options to fund wages, purchase materials or just pay the bills

Invoice factoring vs invoice financing: What they are  

Invoice factoring and financing are two forms of asset-based lending. In both cases, the assets you’re leveraging are your unpaid invoices. The main difference is who collects the final payment from the customer.

With invoice factoring (accounts receivable factoring), the lender (factor) purchases your invoice by paying you a percentage of the outstanding amount (invoice discounting). The factor then handles the process of collecting the invoice payment. Once the customer pays the factor, the remaining amount is factored back to you — minus any fees and a set percentage for the transaction.

With invoice financing, your invoice is the collateral and the lender pays you a percentage of the invoice. In this case, you handle getting payment from your customer. Once your customer pays you, you pay the lender back — with fees and interest included. Depending on your arrangement with the lender, you may receive a final cash sum once you pass along your repayment.

The factoring industry, including both invoice factoring and invoice financing, is a $3 trillion business

Read More: Cash Flow 101. 

How the fees and percentages are determined for invoice factoring and invoice financing

When you research choosing invoice factoring vs invoice financing, you’ll see a range of percentages and rates for processing fees.

The lender sets the processing fee. The percentage you’ll receive from your invoice is a function of the size of the invoice and how the lender views your business and your customer’s business in terms of risk.

The better your business’ financial health and risk profile, the higher percentage you’ll receive when either factoring or financing your invoices.

Invoice factoring vs invoice financing: How the difference affects your business

Because the factor takes over the burden of collecting payment, invoice factoring can really help small businesses that simply don’t have the time to chase down outstanding invoices.

The counterpoint is that your customers may find out that you’re using a factoring service when they’re contacted for collections.

If you prefer to keep control over your collections processes, you may opt for invoice financing over invoice factoring.

Invoice factoring vs invoice financing: How do you choose?

The choice always comes back to what’s right for your business. It’s possible that your customers may not be bothered by invoice factoring if you take the time to communicate with them in advance of factoring the invoice.

But, maybe you just prefer to be the one to control the collections. Or, maybe the lender you prefer only offers one or the other. In the end, it’s all about your personal comfort level.

The benefits of invoice factoring and financing

The approval process for both invoice factoring and invoice financing is faster and friendlier. This is especially helpful for new businesses with only a few years of financial history, businesses who need cash quickly and those who don’t want to gather every form of documentation since the stone age.

Unlike traditional loans that have multiple payments structured in regular intervals spread over several months or years, with invoice factoring and invoice financing you only pay the fees once per invoice. There are also only two payments: You get the bulk of your cash when the invoice is factored or financed and the remaining balance when the invoice is paid.

Learn More: How to Read a Cash Flow Statement.

How long have invoice factoring and invoice financing been around?

As long as there have been businesses supplying services, goods and materials, there have been businesses waiting to be paid.

In fact, asset-based financing dates back to early Mesopotamia during King Hammurabi’s time. This kind of short-term business lending helped fuel the textile industry during the industrial revolution. Asset-based lending continued to gain traction in modern economies as traditional lending models tightened.

Today, the factoring industry, including both invoice factoring and invoice financing, is a $3 trillion business.

What’s next for asset-based lending?

That’s where PayPie comes in. We will transform the way businesses and lenders connect by using blockchain technology to securely and easily trade information. A single ledger technology, blockchain is a way for businesses and lenders to share the same information in near real-time.

As we’re laying the groundwork for our business financing opportunities, we’re also providing sophisticated cash flow forecasting and risk assessment that gives each business a better idea of where they stand in terms of cash flow. (Click here to be notified when our financing solutions are available.)

Get your free cash flow forecast

Our insights and analysis are free. Your dynamic report will give you all the charts and graphs you need to understand the crucial elements affecting your cash flow. It will also contain a proprietary risk score showing how potential lenders might evaluate your business in comparison to others.

If you’re a QuickBooks Online user, all you have to do is sign up for PayPie then connect your account. (Future accounting platform integrations are coming soon.)


PayPie Cash Flow Forecast Example

This article is informational only and does not replace the expertise that comes from working with an accountant, bookkeeper or financial professional.

Image via Pexels.

 

For a Sustainable Ecosystem

Now that Beta is successfully live, I wanted to share with token holders a few insights into PayPie’s operations. One of the most common questions that we receive is about how safe it will be to use PPP tokens on the platform for the invoice buying process. As most of you already know, our company’s foundation is directly based on the answer to the above question. PayPie was born with the goal of ensuring that one business could transact with another in a very safe and secure manner.

Our resources are primarily dedicated to solving this very real problem so that when we connect you as an invoice buyer with an invoice seller and you use your PPP tokens on the platform, you should be as confident as I am because PayPie will grow only if you are successful in operating your business.

The key value at the very core of PayPie is the credit risk assessment itself, meaning that reducing risk to near-zero levels will be PayPie’s main goal. Let us start the process with what one of the pillars we have on the platform, the Credit Hubs. We envisioned them so that we can comply with existing financial regulations as well as bring third parties to provide liquidity for the SMEs as the platform grows.

Initially set up by PayPie as affiliated corporations, Credit Hubs will operate as separate legal entities licensed to carry on their respective financing activities in the jurisdiction in which they operate. As adoption increases, PayPie expects to allow third-party unrelated entities to join the Ecosystem and operate as Credit Hubs.

On successful financing, PPP token holders who deposit their tokens will receive their PPP tokens as principal plus profit payable as additional PPP tokens for providing their tokens as financing capital, the Credit Hub will then receive a fee for facilitating and arranging the financing with SMEs and invoice customers. The KYC provider and PayPie will receive fees for the use of its financial and credit risk information and for the use of the PayPie Price Oracle. We expect the aggregated fee for all components to be around 1% of the invoice value per invoice factoring transaction.

In the coming weeks, you will see some major improvements on the platform as we build more features that not only help SMEs but also to invoice buyers. Traditionally, invoice factoring is considered one of the most secure kinds of service and we believe that with the accuracy and precision from PayPie’s holistic risk assessment, we will be able to keep default rates at minimal levels, likely less than 0.5% (not 5% as some mistakenly stated, 0.5%).

We have very well-experienced members from the factoring business onboarding our team and we are on the right track with our initial data modeling methods. As we build, learn, and improve, I am positive that you will not find any other company around that will consistently deliver again and again a utility like never seen before.

Protecting PPP holders from defaults is an absolute priority for us. There is no real substitute for a stringent due diligence process. A thorough KYC process on SMEs will be in place for the maximum protection of invoice buyers. SMEs will have to co-sign alongside with AR Customers to minimize the defaults.

There are standard financial processes that allow us to take steps to aid debt recovery. In fact, there are debt collection mechanisms that are well established in the offline financial industry elements and even then do not have access to the critical data that you will have.

Despite being often helpful, sometimes side discussions can deviate our focus from our core mission. Let’s make sure that doesn’t happen. Comparing PayPie’s value propositions with others’ is like comparing apples and oranges. In some business models, you must have insurance in 100% of the cases because there is nothing creating real value for operations. The value and benefits that we provide are something that others simply don’t have. Other companies don’t know how SMEs’ bank histories look like, how many times the AR Customer was late in making previous payments, or if AR Customers were making the payments at all.

These are just the tip of the iceberg of a multitude of other data that’s primary to PayPie. Based on the data, we will be able to foresee challenges that you may face way before an invoice is even listed on the platform. There is nothing stopping us to introduce insurance options at any time and our goal is to create a win-win situation for both you and the SMEs, and we want fewer intermediaries to make that happen, not more. We want more success rates, more profit in token holders’ wallets, not less.

 

 

PayPie Joins the Enterprise Ethereum Alliance

VANCOUVER/BC, CANADA – March 2, 2018 – PayPie announced today that it joined the Enterprise Ethereum Alliance (EEA), the world’s largest open source blockchain initiative with over 400 member companies. PayPie joined EEA to enhance its contributions as a trusted leading enterprise in the blockchain industry and to support the adoption of Ethereum-based technology in the enterprise world.

As a member of the EEA, PayPie will collaborate with industry leaders to help spread the benefits of trust and transparency brought by the blockchain to industries worldwide. EEA’s membership represents a wide variety of business sectors from every region of the world, including technology, banking, government, healthcare, energy, pharmaceuticals, marketing, and insurance, as well as a number of fast-growing Ethereum startups. The EEA’s wide range of vendor-led, industry-specific application layer working groups and committees are committed to increasing the adoption of Ethereum technology in the enterprise.

“We are always searching for new ways of strengthening the blockchain technology community as a whole and of growing our own partnerships ecosystem with organizations that bring new synergies to the platform. The support for blockchain improvement and adoption must be constant to enable fintech companies like PayPie to expand and bring value to an ever-growing business audience eager for credit disruption,” said PayPie’s CMO Yohan Varella.

About PayPie

The PayPie platform brings ultimate trust and transparency to the business lending by introducing the world’s first blockchain powered credit risk assessment based on business accounting. The platform challenges Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion’s status quo by assessing businesses credit risk profiles through a built-in algorithm that accounts 150 data points from near real-time financial data-based risk scores hashed on the Ethereum blockchain, hence building a faster, safer, and smart contract-powered credit scoring for banks, lenders, and financial institutions. Furthermore, the platform will introduce its own invoice factoring marketplace in which SMEs and invoices will be rated by PayPie’s unique credit risk score for a trustworthy decision system. PayPie has launched its conceptual Alpha version in January 2018 and has scheduled to launch its Beta version at any time before the end of April 2018.

For additional information about PayPie, please reach out to [email protected] or visit paypie.com

About The Enterprise Ethereum Alliance

The EEA is an industry-supported, not-for-profit established to build, promote, and broadly support Ethereum-based technology best practices, open standards, and open-source reference architectures. The EEA is helping to evolve Ethereum into an enterprise-grade technology, providing research and development in a range of areas, including privacy, confidentiality, scalability, and security. The EEA is also investigating hybrid architectures that span both permissioned and public Ethereum networks as well as industry-specific application layer working groups. EEA will collectively develop open industry standards and facilitate collaboration with its member base and is open to any members of the Ethereum community who wish to participate. This open-source framework will enable the mass adoption at a depth and breadth otherwise unachievable in individual corporate silos and provide insight to the future of scalability, privacy, and confidentiality of the public Ethereum permissionless network.

For additional information about joining EEA, please reach out to [email protected] or visit entethalliance.org